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Meely LaBauve by Ken Wells

Meely LaBauve by Ken Wells (2000)
Meely LaBauve is a fifteen-year-old Cajun boy living in the swamps of 1960s Louisiana. His mother long dead and his father often away hunting gators, Meely is left to his own devices to feed himself and go to school when he wishes. When a school bully, Junior Guidry, decides to teach Meely a lesson, it takes Meely, his pa and the friends he didn’t know he had to outwit Junior and his crooked cop uncle, and triumph before the judge. This coming-of-age novel is reminiscent of Huckleberry Finn and has a fine ear for dialect and some laugh-out-loud moments. You will root for Meely.
Denise

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (2007)
This follow-up to Hosseini’s bestseller, The Kite Runner, is beautifully written and extremely powerful. It depicts life in Afghanistan during the communist takeover from the perspective of two women. Their struggles and suffering are heart-wrenching and often disturbing to read about, but I couldn’t put it down.
Mary

The Camel Bookmobile by Masha Hamilton

The Camel Bookmobile by Masha Hamilton (2007)
Fiona Sweeney, a 36-year-old Brooklyn librarian, jumps at the opportunity to travel to Kenya to manage a bookmobile service to the nomadic bush people. Traveling by camel, Fi brings the written word to Mididima, her favorite stop. Hamilton captures the traditional nomadic life beautifully. The clash between Fi’s well-intended help and this traditional culture raises interesting questions.

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