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Shirley

And Then You Die by Iris Johansen

And Then You Die by Iris Johansen (1998)
This thriller grabbed me immediately and kept me on the run with Bess Grady, a photojournalist who comes upon a horrifying site in a Mexican village. Would she, her sister, and a man she must trust against her better judgment escape each new dangerous situation? This page turner pulls plot ideas from headline events and shows some frightening possibilities that could come to pass.
IPPL Staff

Garden of Beasts by Jeffery Deaver

Garden of Beasts by Jeffery Deaver (2004)
An American hit man is hired to go to Berlin during the 1936 Olympics to take out a high ranking Nazi. Check out the author's website for more about the novel, an interview, an excerpt, and more.

The 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing start today! Visit NBC's Olympic website for TV and online listings, results, plus information about the U.S. athletes and teams.
Jennifer

Heartbreaker by Julie Garwood

Heartbreaker by Julie Garwood (2000)
Father Tommy Madden is counting the minutes until he can leave the sweltering confessional. Before he can escape, a cocky serial killer enters the confessional and brags about a murder he’s already committed and the one he plans to commit next. His intended victim? Tommy’s sister Laurant.

FBI agent Nick Buchanan swoops into action after a frantic call from his best friend Tommy. After Laurant refuses to hide, Nick and a team of FBI agents set a trap for the killer in Holy Oaks, Iowa. And that's when the fun begins.

Garwood’s first foray into contemporary fiction proves successful. This engrossing thriller keeps you guessing about the killer’s identity, while you’re also laughing at the dynamics of Nick and Laurant’s growing relationship.


Check out an interview with the author or read an excerpt.
IPPL Staff

The Master of the Delta by Thomas H. Cook

The Master of the Delta by Thomas H. Cook (2008)
Jack Branch is living in the moldering remains of his family’s plantation house. Jack, formerly a teacher at the local high school, relives events from the 1950s when his encouragement of a young boy to write about his father, a local murderer who died in jail, opens up wounds and provokes actions that end in tragedy.

Publisher's Weekly has an article about the author, and both Yahoo! and The Washington Post have reviews.
IPPL Staff

Bad Luck and Trouble by Lee Child

Bad Luck and Trouble by Lee Child (2007)
As read by expert reader Dick Hill, Bad Luck and Trouble (#11 in the series) goes into overdrive as Jack Reacher solves the brutal murder of a former colleague. Jack Reacher reunites his old team of elite investigators into a wildly exciting assault. Not always probable, tough, mach Jack raises the level of excitement to high – fun. Listen and enjoy.
Denise

Third Degree by Greg Iles

Third Degree by Greg Iles (2007)
A fast-paced page turner! This thriller unfolds over a 24-hour period, during which a rational, intelligent physician spins out of control after suspecting his wife of having an affair. There are several sub-plots with twists and turns that keep you on edge till the end.
IPPL Staff

The Eye of the Abyss by Marshall Browne

The Eye of the Abyss by Marshall Browne (2003)

In late 1938, Franz Schmidt, an unassuming, slight man and bank auditor, takes up the anti-Nazi cause as his bank is taken over by the Party.

The New York Times has an overview of this novel and other crime stories from 2003.

Mary

The Rabbit Factory by Marshall Karp

The Rabbit Factory by Marshall Karp (2006)
LAPD Detectives Mike Lomax and Terry Biggs investigate the murder of an employee dressed as the Rambunctious Rabbit, the mascot for a Disney-like theme park called Familyland. When another Familyland employee is murdered, followed by another murder, pressure to solve the murders mounts. The action filled plot will keep you guessing and the dialogue will keep you laughing. Karp continues the series with Bloodthirsty, published in 2007. Karp’s fast paced, satiric series will appeal to Carl Hiaasen and Tim Dorsey fans.

Visit the official website of Mike Lomax, Terry Biggs, and Marshall Karp for information on the author, or visit BookBrowse to find a reading guide for The Rabbit Factory.
IPPL Staff

Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin

Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin (2007)
A novel that succeeds as both historical fiction and crime-thriller, the story contains fascinating details of historical forensic medicine, entertaining notes on women in science (the medical school at Salerno is not fictional) and a wonderful plot with lots of twists.

Four children have been found dead and mutilated. The Jews of Cambridge have been blamed for the murders, the most prominent Jewish moneylender and his wife have been killed by a mob, and the rest of the Jewish community is shut up in the castle under the protection of the sheriff.

King Henry I is invested in their fate because without the taxes received from Jewish merchants, his treasuries would go bankrupt. Hoping to exonerate the Jews, he appeals to his cousin, the king of Sicily, to send his best master of the art of death: a doctor skilled in “reading” bodies. Enter Vesuvia Adelia Rachel Ortese Aguilar, 25, the best mistress of death that the medical school at Salerno has ever produced. Adelia, along with Simon of Naples (a Jew) and Mansur (a Moor), must find the murderer before he can kill again.
IPPL Staff

The Serpent’s Daughter by Suzanne Arruda

The Serpent’s Daughter: A Jade del Cameron Mystery by Suzanne Arruda (2008)
This is the third entry in the Jade del Cameron mysteries. Jade grew up on a ranch in New Mexico and served as an ambulance driver during WWI. Her abilities to survive in extreme circumstances serve her well as her adventures take her to Colonial East Africa. In The Mark of the Lion, she searches for the murderer of her dead fiancé’s father and in Stalking Ivory, she tracks down elephant poachers. Her latest adventure takes her to Morocco where she is to meet her mother before heading off to Spain to buy a stallion for the family ranch. When Jade’s mother is kidnapped, Jade chases after Tangier to Marrakesh. These charming books are part mystery, part Saturday afternoon matinee adventure.

Check out the author's blog for information on Jade and the time period in which she lives.
IPPL Staff

City of Shadows by Ariana Franklin

City of Shadows by Ariana Franklin (2006)
The mysterious origins of Anna Anderson, who for sixty years proclaimed herself Anastasia, only survivor of the massacre of Czar Nicholas II’s family, are entwined with the rise of the Nazi party in 1920s and 1930s Berlin.
Mary

Don’t Look Back by Karin Fossum

Don’t Look Back by Karin Fossum (2003)
Translated into sixteen languages, Norwegian author Fossum’s Inspector Konrad Sejer series have finally hit the U.S. The murdered body of a teenage girl found at a mountain top lake tears apart the façade of this tranquil Norwegian village. Other translated novels include: He Who Fears the Wolf (2005), When the Devil Holds the Candle (2006), and The Indian Bride (2007).
IPPL Staff

Limitations by Scott Turow

Limitations by Scott Turow (2006)
For the uninitiated, once again Turow delves into the mystery of how the law works. George Mason is judge of the Court of Appeals in Kindle County. He is faced with three problems: his wife has cancer, he receives threatening e-mails, and finally, he must decide the outcome of a horrific case of sexual assault. Turow ingeniously resolves these issues, especially the case of sexual assault. A fascinating book.

Check out the author's website for biographical information, a reading group guide (pdf), and the author's backlist.
IPPL Staff

Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn

Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn (2007)
In 1886, Lady Julia Grey sees her husband collapse and die in the middle of a party at their London townhouse. Julia believes her husband died of natural causes, but, “not so” says Nicholas Brisbane, the mysterious and attractive private detective Julia’s husband had hired because he feared for his life. A charming, romantic book of suspense.
IPPL Staff

Zugzwang by Ronan Bennett

ZugzwangZugzwang by Ronan Bennett (2007)
In German, zugzwang is a term used in chess to describe a position in which a player is reduced to a state of utter helplessness. The action is set in pre-Revolutionary Russia: St. Petersburg, 1914. Dr. Otto Spethmann is a psychiatrist who is drawn into a murderous intrigue and an intriguing romance. It’s a deadly game, but good read.